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How Virginia Reckless Driving Laws Compare to Surrounding States and Washington D.C.

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Reckless Driving Penalties in VirginiaVirginia doesn’t fool around when it comes to reckless driving. Instead, the state has strict reckless driving laws when compared to surrounding states.

Reckless Driving Laws and Penalties in Virginia and Surrounding States

Below, is a comparison of reckless driving laws in the states bordering Virginia:

State

Reckless Driving Law

Reckless Driving Penalty

Virginia

Reckless driving is defined as operating a vehicle at a speed or in a manner so as to endanger the life, limb, or property of any person. Additionally, Virginia law lists more than a dozen different scenarios that are automatically considered to be reckless driving including, but not limited to:

*Racing

*Failing to yield the right of way

*Driving 20 mph or more over the speed limit

*Driving over 80 mph

*Driving too fast for conditions

*Failing to signal properly

*Passing a stopped school bus

*Passing at a railroad crossing

*Passing at the crest of a grade or curve

*Driving two abreast in a single lane

*Driving with an obstructed view

*Driving with faulty brakes

The very first time you are convicted of reckless driving you may face up to 12 months in prison, a fine of up to $2,500, and a license suspension.

Washington D.C.

Reckless driving is defined as driving carelessly or heedlessly in willful or wanton disregard for the rights or safety of others or without due caution or circumspection and at a speed or in a manner so as to endanger or be likely to endanger a person or property.

Aggravated reckless driving is defined as driving recklessly and exceeding the speed limit by at least 30 mph, hurting someone else, or causing property damage of more than $1,000.

First offense: up to 90 days in jail and up to $500 in fines.

Second offense: up to 180 days in jail and up to $1,000 in fines.

Third or more offense: up to a year in jail and up to $2,500 in fines.

First aggravated reckless driving offense: up to 180 days in jail and up to $1,000 in fines.

Subsequent aggravated reckless driving offense within two years: up to a year in jail and up to $2,500 in fines.

 

A reckless driving charge can result in six demerit points on a driving record and an aggravated reckless driving charge can result in 12 demerit points.

 

Maryland

A driver can be convicted of reckless driving if the driver drives with willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property.

The scheduled fine for reckless driving is $510. The judge may reduce this amount or increase it up to $1,000.

 

Six demerit points are added to the motorist’s driving record.

Kentucky

A driver must drive in a careful manner with regard for the safety and convenience of pedestrians and other vehicles upon the highway. Drivers must not drive in such a way as to injure the highway.

First and second offenses: $20-$100 in fines.

Third offense within 12 months: license revocation for six months.

Four points will also be added to the driver’s driving record for each conviction.

West Virginia

A driver can be convicted of reckless driving if the driver drives with willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property.

First offense: Five to ninety days in jail and $25-$500 in fines.

Subsequent offense: Ten days to six months in jail and $50-$1,000 in fines. Mandatory license revocation for drivers convicted of reckless driving three times in a 24-month period.

For offenses involving serious bodily injury: Ten days to six months in jail and $50-$1,000 in fines.

A conviction also adds six demerit points to the driver’s driving record.

Tennessee

A driver can be convicted of reckless driving if the driver drives with willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property or drives into a flooded area that is clearly marked.

 

First offense: Up to six months in jail, six demerit points on driving record, and $580 in fines.

Subsequent offense in one year period: 12-month license suspension.

North Carolina

Reckless driving is defined as driving on a public road carelessly and heedlessly in willful or wanton disregard of the rights or safety of others or without due caution or circumspection and at a speed or in a manner so as to endanger or be likely to endanger any person or property.

First offense: up to 30 days in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

Subsequent offense: up to 60 days in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

In certain circumstances, a reckless driving conviction can also result in a suspended license.

 

Any time you are accused of a crime, it is important to get help. However, it is important to know that Virginia takes reckless driving charges very seriously and that you have a lot at stake if you have been charged with this crime.

Whether you live in Virginia, you were here visiting, or you are just passing through the state, it is important to consult with an experienced Virginia reckless driving lawyer as soon as you are charged with the crime of reckless driving. Please reach out to us via this website or by phone as soon as possible so that we can start preparing your defense today.

 

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